What should I breed? What morphs do I make? What to sell? What breeding projects?

what should I breed leopard gecko bandit hatchling eggs

What should I breed?

People often ask what should I breed, or what morphs do I breed to sell?  Here’s a checklist of what we recommend you to go by.

What should I breed?  Well what morphs do you like?

You should always pick morphs that interest you.  This way, whether your breeding projects take off or not, whether you can sell your geckos, you’ll always love what you breed and hatch out.  Many gecko projects we have were picked because we enjoyed them.  Projects such as the bandit project and sunglows were my personal favorites.  This is key to keeping your interest level high.

Market research

As much as you should pick breeding projects you enjoy, you should also realize some morphs are not as popular.  There’s no doubt some morphs are purchased more than others.  Most do sell but they don’t sell at the same rate.  It’s your job to do some research.  Go browse some gecko websites, you’ll want to look at what morphs are sold, which breeds are sold quicker than others, and what morphs tend to stay available longer.  You pretty much want to conduct your own market research.

Avoid muddy water and multiple hets

Continue reading “What should I breed? What morphs do I make? What to sell? What breeding projects?”

Refocused, Energized, Ares SG Mack Snow Raptor Leopard Gecko Update

It has been 3 years since we introduced Ares to the world, remember this post.  Since then we’ve had some challenges finding suitable females to go with Ares.  People have been asking us to update on his progress so here it is.

We’ve tried no less than 6 super giant females with Ares, all but 1 have rejected him due to his size.  I mean he is 12 inches long, 170g, the largest female we have in our collection is around 120g.  So there are sizable differences between Ares and potential female breeders.

Every time we’ve tried, the females seem spooked by his size, and just started running, biting, tail waving, etc..  These are not normal behaviors by ovulating female leopard geckos.  So the only explanation we have is that they are simply spooked by his size. Continue reading “Refocused, Energized, Ares SG Mack Snow Raptor Leopard Gecko Update”

So You Want To Breed – Do’s and Don’ts of Breeding Leopard Geckos

I initially made this post on a gecko forum, but figured it may be helpful to those that find my blog via google search in the future.   In this “So You Want To Breed” blog article, I’ll list the do’s and don’ts of breeding leopard geckos.  This is a general guide for new breeders.  Feel free to add comments to what I may have missed.

Don’t:

-Don’t mix the 3 albino strains (tremper, bell, rainwater), they are not compatible.

-Don’t breed if you are not sure of the genetics behind the parents.

-Don’t breed if you can’t afford to feed, house, and care for the hatchlings. From one single pairing you can expect 6-16 eggs.

-Don’t breed if you can’t afford unexpected vet costs when/if you should need to take your geckos to see a vet. Things happen, sometimes they get sick, sometimes they need specialist help. Make sure you have money stashed away for emergencies.

-Don’t breed if you see any abnormalities or genetic defects on your geckos, these include but not limited to tail kinks, eye crinkles, over/under-bite, crooked spine, etc.. Also don’t breed if your geckos suffer health issues such as MBD (metabolic bone disease), or severe enigma syndrome. Continue reading “So You Want To Breed – Do’s and Don’ts of Breeding Leopard Geckos”

Leopard Gecko Tail Waving Behavior – Defensive Posture

leopard gecko tail waving behavior defensive posture shake rattle

There are different leopard gecko tail waving and rattling behaviors, understanding them will allow you to understand your leopard geckos better.  I’ve been waiting for awhile to get this tail waving behavior captured on video.  Today while cleaning out a leopard gecko’s enclosure, I placed this gecko in a temporary critter tote.  She saw her own reflection and started to wave her tail (as seen in the video above).

This particular back & forth leopard gecko tail waving is a defensive posture

This is the gecko’s way of distracting a potential attacker.  They wave their tails so the attackers would focus on their tail, rather than their body.  The idea is that the attacker would strike at their tail, at which time the gecko would break off the tail and run away.  So if you ever see your leopard gecko waving their tail at another gecko, it’s best to separate them right away.  When a gecko is spooked, any slight movement could cause a gecko to strike out and bite.  You can prevent some serious injuries by noticing these signs right away.

Leopard geckos do regenerate their tails, although they won’t look the same.  See the picture below for an example of a regenerated tail tip.

emerine leopard gecko example regenerated tail

This is not to be confused with tail shaking, like a rattlesnake tail rattling

Continue reading “Leopard Gecko Tail Waving Behavior – Defensive Posture”